Sunday Column: A song about you

I spend my life telling stories. Most days it’s my own, but much of the time I’m looking for inspiration in others, whether it’s from behind the lens of my camera, my guitar or my computer screen, it’s the people out here who have things to say.

Things to teach us about the human condition.

Boomtown video

In this part of the country there are so many stories moving in and out of this place at a rapid pace. Each day in my booming community, something changes, a new house goes up, a new road is built, a restaurant opens its doors. It’s hard to keep up. Everything’s moving so fast.

A few years ago, when we were still living in the little old house, I sat down on the bed with my guitar while Husband cooked soup in the kitchen and I wrote a song called Boomtown, a song that attempts to tell the story of the different souls who have made their way to my hometown in the face of a the oil boom for a second chance, a job, a way to be home. A true folk song, the closest I could get to the ones I was raised on.

I’ve written about this place, this Boomtown, multiple times. The song has been the backdrop in documentaries and stories around the country, and even over seas.

This summer I decided it might be time to show you what it looks like here, in a different way.

Boomtown video 3

So a few weeks ago we gathered the band and hashed out a plan to make Boomtown into a music video.

Boomtown video 2

I can’t wait to show you these people, the heartbeat of a community that isย hope and worry and chaos and relief, dreams-come-true and dreams shattered all in one place.

This week’s column is about the video and the people of Boomtown.

Boomtown 4

Coming Home: Listening to the stories of Boomtown
by Jessie Veeder
9-7-14
Forum Communications
http://www.inforum.com

Stay tuned…

Buy Boomtown and the rest of my album, “Nothing’s Forever” on iTunes or at www.jessieveedermusic.comย 

3 thoughts on “Sunday Column: A song about you

  1. The “Why are you here?” question is particularly interesting to me in your part of the country right now. There is a need, in fact a survival imperative, to develop a sense of empathy and connection with the people who have come – or stayed – to work in northwestern ND right now. Without that ability to see the humanity in the folks who are crossing your path there will be a greater and greater tendency to perceive and treat those strangers as “other” and to disconnect. The longterm effect on the area of dehumanizing our neighbors will be far worse than the effect of digging up all our oil.

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